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Future Fraud: Online Conference by Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science (JDI), UCL

1-4pm, 12th July 2022 - ONLINE

   

This free-to-attend event will feature a range of speakers addressing current themes in future fraud.

 

The ongoing digital revolution is transforming the way we live, work and interact. But these same changes are opening up countless new ways for criminals to exploit vulnerabilities. New forms of online fraud – or old fraud enacted using new digital methods – are growing exponentially, from cryptocurrency scams to identity theft to tailored ransomware attacks. The problem will be exacerbated as we enter the new ‘metaverse’ era where we interact and carry out activities in virtual worlds. This free-to-attend event will feature a range of speakers addressing current themes in this space. Industry and policy practitioners will come together with academic speakers to examine this pervasive crime and how it will continue to evolve in the coming years.

 

To register please click here

 

Organised by the UCL Dawes Centre for Future Crime.

Webinar: Improving the Safety of Women & Girls: Delivering Structural Changes to Empower Women, Reduce Violence & Increase Prosecutions

Tuesday, July 12th 2022

The UK is facing an ‘epidemic’ of violence against women and girls (VAWG). Figures released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show that for the year ending September 2021, sexual offences recorded by the police were the highest on record, a 12% increase from the previous year, whilst a survey in June 2021 revealed that 32% of women over 16 had experienced at least one form of harassment in the previous 12 months. The outpouring of testimonies in the wake of the murder of Sarah Everard, sparked calls for urgent change, starting a conversation which was galvanised by further killings, including those of Sabina Nessa and Gracie Spinks. Issues of institutionalised misogyny and declining conviction rates have left women and girls feeling unsafe in public spaces, with 89% of those who had experienced harassment reporting feeling ‘very or fairly unsafe’ walking on their own after dark.

In July 2021, the Home Office published their VAWG strategy, with the aim of boosting support for victims and survivors, increasing the number of perpetrators brought to justice, and ultimately reducing the prevalence of VAWG. Since publication, the Government has implemented a number of measures, including the appointment of a National Policing Lead for Tackling VAWG, and the launch of a pilot tool, StreetSafe, enabling the public to report areas in which they feel unsafe. There has also been increased investment in this area, with funding for 79 local projects and initiatives to improve the safety of women in public spaces across England & Wales totalling more than £27.7 million. In addition to these measures, the Government has sought to increase protection and recognition of survivors and victims through the enactment of the Domestic Abuse Act 2022 and the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, the latter creating tougher sentences for perpetrators. The Home Office has also recently launched a new public campaign, 'enough', aimed at preventing VAWG by shaping the attitudes that normalise such abuse.

However, for many, these measures largely fail to go beyond the surface of the problem, offering no more than a ‘sticking plaster solution’ for an issue which is systemic in nature, with many warning that measures which focus on street lighting and police presence do little to eradicate the ‘locker room’ culture which has provided a breeding ground for misogyny. Organisations such as End Violence Against Women (EVAW), alongside MPs including Jess Phillips, have also drawn attention to the persisting issues facing women who report rape and sexual assault, arguing that recent measures have not gone far enough to improve the treatment of these issues in the criminal justice system, despite rising numbers of reports. In the wake of the Independent Office for Police Conduct’s February 2022 report into Met Police conduct, which revealed a culture of institutionalised misogyny and racism, police forces across the UK have also faced significant pressure to reform, with EVAW calling for a radical overhaul of the system.

This symposium is, therefore, an invaluable opportunity to discuss and evaluate strategies for widespread structural change. Delegates will discuss methods to prevent VAWG, support and protect victims and survivors, and increase the effectiveness of the criminal justice system in dealing with these cases.

Programme

  • Examine the current legislative framework for tackling violence against women and girls and discuss opportunities for further legislative reform
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the government’s VAWG strategy, and the extent to which this is sufficient in targeting the issue
  • Discuss steps to improve safety on UK streets and public spaces
  • Understand why certain crimes such as rape have such low prosecution rates and how that can be improved
  • Explore how to improve trust in the criminal justice system to ensure that women are empowered to report VAWG
  • Identify and examine the fundamental causes of violence against women and girls, and raise awareness of the need to target institutionalised misogyny
  • Consider opportunities for education programs to target and discourage misogyny
  • Address intersectionalities and understand how to support the most vulnerable groups
  • Explore how to improve information sharing across agencies to improve police coordination in preventing and combating VAWG
  • Evaluate the suitability of proposed changes to standards, behaviours and practices within policing
  • Share best practices of successful campaigns raising awareness and preventing gender-based violence through education

To register for the briefing, please click here.

 

Webinar: Improving the Safety of Women & Girls: Delivering Structural Changes to Empower Women, Reduce Violence & Increase Prosecutions

Tuesday, July 12th 2022

The UK is facing an ‘epidemic’ of violence against women and girls (VAWG). Figures released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show that for the year ending September 2021, sexual offences recorded by the police were the highest on record, a 12% increase from the previous year, whilst a survey in June 2021 revealed that 32% of women over 16 had experienced at least one form of harassment in the previous 12 months. The outpouring of testimonies in the wake of the murder of Sarah Everard, sparked calls for urgent change, starting a conversation which was galvanised by further killings, including those of Sabina Nessa and Gracie Spinks. Issues of institutionalised misogyny and declining conviction rates have left women and girls feeling unsafe in public spaces, with 89% of those who had experienced harassment reporting feeling ‘very or fairly unsafe’ walking on their own after dark.

In July 2021, the Home Office published their VAWG strategy, with the aim of boosting support for victims and survivors, increasing the number of perpetrators brought to justice, and ultimately reducing the prevalence of VAWG. Since publication, the Government has implemented a number of measures, including the appointment of a National Policing Lead for Tackling VAWG, and the launch of a pilot tool, StreetSafe, enabling the public to report areas in which they feel unsafe. There has also been increased investment in this area, with funding for 79 local projects and initiatives to improve the safety of women in public spaces across England & Wales totalling more than £27.7 million. In addition to these measures, the Government has sought to increase protection and recognition of survivors and victims through the enactment of the Domestic Abuse Act 2022 and the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, the latter creating tougher sentences for perpetrators. The Home Office has also recently launched a new public campaign, 'enough', aimed at preventing VAWG by shaping the attitudes that normalise such abuse.

However, for many, these measures largely fail to go beyond the surface of the problem, offering no more than a ‘sticking plaster solution’ for an issue which is systemic in nature, with many warning that measures which focus on street lighting and police presence do little to eradicate the ‘locker room’ culture which has provided a breeding ground for misogyny. Organisations such as End Violence Against Women (EVAW), alongside MPs including Jess Phillips, have also drawn attention to the persisting issues facing women who report rape and sexual assault, arguing that recent measures have not gone far enough to improve the treatment of these issues in the criminal justice system, despite rising numbers of reports. In the wake of the Independent Office for Police Conduct’s February 2022 report into Met Police conduct, which revealed a culture of institutionalised misogyny and racism, police forces across the UK have also faced significant pressure to reform, with EVAW calling for a radical overhaul of the system.

This symposium is, therefore, an invaluable opportunity to discuss and evaluate strategies for widespread structural change. Delegates will discuss methods to prevent VAWG, support and protect victims and survivors, and increase the effectiveness of the criminal justice system in dealing with these cases.

Programme

  • Examine the current legislative framework for tackling violence against women and girls and discuss opportunities for further legislative reform
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the government’s VAWG strategy, and the extent to which this is sufficient in targeting the issue
  • Discuss steps to improve safety on UK streets and public spaces
  • Understand why certain crimes such as rape have such low prosecution rates and how that can be improved
  • Explore how to improve trust in the criminal justice system to ensure that women are empowered to report VAWG
  • Identify and examine the fundamental causes of violence against women and girls, and raise awareness of the need to target institutionalised misogyny
  • Consider opportunities for education programs to target and discourage misogyny
  • Address intersectionalities and understand how to support the most vulnerable groups
  • Explore how to improve information sharing across agencies to improve police coordination in preventing and combating VAWG
  • Evaluate the suitability of proposed changes to standards, behaviours and practices within policing
  • Share best practices of successful campaigns raising awareness and preventing gender-based violence through education

To register for the briefing, please click here.

 

AIC: Latest crime and justice alerts are now available

The latest crime and justice publications from the AIC and resources from around the world are now available from our Alert Service. Popular topics can be accessed from the drop down list and wherever possible full text is provided via an Electronic Resource link.
Please feel free to share this with your colleagues and let them know that they can also subscribe to the list.


Newest publication
Economic insecurity and intimate partner violence in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic  (May 2022)

Latest CriminologyTV release
Exploring the relationship between economic insecurity and intimate partner violence presented by Anthony Morgan (May 2022)

 

Register for CJPE Summer Course on Sexual Violence

On 5-8 July 2022, the 4th edition of the International Criminal Justice Summer Course is dedicated to ‘Responses to Sexual Violence’, and will take place in Barcelona, at the Centre for Legal Studies and Specialised Training.

It will be a unique international opportunity to meet professionals from other countries, from different disciplines and from a range of backgrounds, to share and to learn from people doing the same work in different European realities.

The focus will be upon practice: what works – new ideas – restorative methods – preventing reoffending – research – workshops – practice visits – sharing experience. The aim is that participants bring their expertise and, through engaging with the courses, become better equipped and informed about current approaches and effective interventions.
More detailed information can be checked in the booklet.

Each organisation member of CJPE will address this topic from a different but complementary angle:

  • The European Organisation of Prison and Correctional Services (EuroPris) will focus on ethics in management and treatment of individuals sentenced for a sexual offense;
  • The Confederation of European Probation (CEP) will explore the better understanding of sexual abuse to create effective policy and practice;
  • The European Forum for Restorative Justice (EFRJ) will look how to include victims and use restorative justice approaches to respond to sexual violence.

By sharing ideas and considering the very latest research and programmes, participants will be stimulated to participate in the debate on how to respond to sexual violence. Methods will include training, presentations, discussions among the participants as well as study visits.

 

Registration and fees

When registering for the Summer Course you will need to choose among different options with regard to the courses, seminars, study visits and other social events. In the booklet you will find all the information you need in order to make your choices.
 

To register for the Summer Course please click here.


 

Webinar: Addressing Anti-Social Behaviour: Ensuring Effective Responses and Supporting Victims

Tuesday, June 21st 2022

Anti-social behaviour (ASB) incidents surged following the start of the Covid-19 pandemic. According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the number of incidents recorded by police reached 2 million in the year ending March 2021, an increase of 48% compared to the year before. The Telephone-operated Crime Survey for England and Wales indicates that 26% of adults directly witnessed or experienced anti-social behaviour in their area in the 12 months to March 2021. According to a 2021 report by Resolve, 45% of people in the UK claimed ASB is a problem where they live and 56% of victims or witnesses did not report it. The report findings suggest incidences of ASB and its negative impacts are much higher than official statistics acknowledge. Police reports from England, Northern Ireland, and Wales have reported a declining trend in reports of ASB since the lifting of lockdown. Despite the decline, however, levels of ASB remain higher than in 2019 and ASB remains a grave concern where victims are being left to fend for themselves, with little tangible support, and local authorities and registered providers continuing to struggle to find the resources to cope.

ASB incidents are governed by the Anti-Social Behaviour Crime and Policing Act 2014 (ASBCP Act), which introduced the Community Trigger, enabling victims to request a review of their case where no effective action has been taken to resolve it. This mechanism enables community stakeholders to share expertise, actively resolve situations, and provide perpetrators with access to support in order to prevent re-occurrence. Analysis, however, reveals that overall agency compliance with the legislation is problematic. Research published in 2021 by Sheffield Hallam University also indicates that “repeat secondary victimisation is a risk for victims of ASB who activate the Community Trigger”. The research author, Vicky Heap, adds that “It is clear that ASB as a policy domain has reduced in priority since the mid-2000s, evidenced by the lack of funding provided to Police and Crime Commissioners to procure services for ASB victims (Ministry of Justice, 2013).”

The government’s Beating Crime Plan was launched by the government, in July 2021, with policies aimed at tackling ASB a particular focus. These included: better cooperation between Police and Crime Commissioners, local authorities and other partners; updating statutory guidance on ASB; and improving the use of tools within the ASBCP Act. The plan has been described as “weird and gimmicky” by police chiefs. In December 2021, the government published plans to enact a Victims’ Law aimed at guaranteeing greater consultation with victims during the criminal justice process in order to ensure that their voices are properly heard, and to hold national agencies such as the police, the Crown Prosecution Service and courts service to appropriately account for the service that they deliver to victims. A Home Office document leaked to The Guardian in April 2022 indicates that the public is far from convinced by government initiatives for tackling crime. The document, which details polling carried out by the government in February, states that only 35% of the public have confidence in the government’s handling of crime and justice.

This symposium, taking place in the lead-up to ASB Awareness Week (18-24 July), provides an invaluable opportunity to examine existing legislation and recent government initiatives designed to tackle ASB and support victims, and to assess the wider, underlying societal problems and policy failures that need to be addressed in order to make meaningful change in this area.

Programme

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the current legislative framework for dealing with ASB (ASBCPA Act) and discuss opportunities for reform
  • Assess the use of the Community Trigger and identify methods to ensure it is accessible for victims and utilised in practice 
  • Examine how local authorities and registered providers (RPs) can prevent ASB and protect victims in their areas
  • Explore opportunities to enhance the legal rights of victims of ASB, particularly through the proposed Victims’ Law
  • Debate the success of government initiatives such as the Beating Crime Plan, and assess what more it can do to tackle ASB
  • Analyse the role of the police and PCCs in dealing with ASB and how the response can be improved
  • Assess the effectiveness of local responses to reports of ASB, and develop strategies for a more co-ordinated multi-agency response
  • Raise awareness of the seriousness of ASB and its potentially devastating impacts upon victims, and identify methods to debunk the myth that it is a ‘low-level crime’
  • Explore successful educational programs raising awareness of ASB within housing areas
  • Assess the wider, underlying societal problems and policy failures that contribute to ASB
  • Evaluate the impact of Covid-19 on levels of ASB in communities and discuss opportunities for targeted responses to increased tensions and isolated victims
  • Reflect on the need to gather more data on instances of ASB and create a plan for the future

To register for the briefing, please click here.