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SVRI Knowledge Exchange. Engaging the private sector to prevent and address violence against women. SVRI Knowledge Exchange. SVRI and BSR

Pino, A., Dartnall, E., Shields, L., Flores Guevara, L., Duma, T., Lawrence, T., Majumdar, S., Rizvi, R. (2020).

Violence against women (VAW) remains a globally pervasive human rights violation. According to Care International, one-third of women worldwide will experience physical and/or sexual violence at the hands of men at some point in their lives.i Much of this happens in the workplace, including the factory environments of global supply chains. In India and Bangladesh, for example, research shows that some 60% of garment workers have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace.ii To most effectively respond to VAW – and successfully prevent it – both multi-sectoral and broad societal involvement are required. The initiatives of governments and civil society organisations alone are not sufficient for the effective roll-out of the vast number of programmes required to affect the widespread change in social norms and behaviour that is required. Nor are they sufficient to cater for survivors in need of services. Active engagement with the private sector is required. The UN’s 17 Social Development Goals (SDGs) represent a plan of action to promote partnerships with the private sector in order to achieve what the UN calls the 2030 Agenda. The International Labour Organization’s Violence and Harassment Convention of 2019 (or ILO’s C190) additionally draws attention to how workplace violence, which includes sexual harrassment and abuse, is a human rights violation. Global movements such as #MeToo, #TimesUp, #Cuéntalo, #NiUnaMás, and #NiUnaMenos, have further opened the door for millions of women to share their stories, not only of sexual abuse, harassment and rape, but also of everyday sexism, including sexism in the workplace. These conventions and movements are helping to leverage impetus for a wider discussion of the role of the private sector in not only responding to violence against women, but ending it. Private sector engagement in the VAW terrain is not new, but it is also by no means exhaustive.

This Knowledge Exchange is based on a SVRI/BSR joint webinar discussing the role of the private sector in violence against women (VAW) prevention and response. It offers tips and recommendations for effective private sector partnership with due consideration for the ongoing prevalence of violence and harassment of women in the workplace

RACE, POLICE & PROTESTS

July 2020

"CJRA has been working closely with experts to inform the national dialogue on issues related to race, policing and protests. The Alliance published a one-page resource featuring articles from the American Society of Criminology and the Academy of Criminal Justice journals as well as a few of our scholars on these issues.

Through timely proactive efforts, we secured more than 75 interviews with our experts and media publications. We encourage you to share this resource, which can be found here, with your colleagues. As always, we welcome suggestions and feedback.

Justice Quarterly also published a themed issue on this topic, which is open access through August and can be found here".

 

EUROCRIM 2020: 20th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. 10-11 September 2020 online edition

You can check the draft programme of Eurocrim 2020 following this link:

https://e024fbf5-6c7b-4d28-a274-3ea640442f02.filesusr.com/ugd/7a9c76_6f3ddf703ef4492d811bd434dcad65c7.pdf

(in the document, you may click on the name of each working group on page 3 to see their panels).

 

The final programme will be available in early September.

 

The 24-hour Conference on Global Organized Crime

 

A virtual conference to bring together OC scholars in the absence of meetings during the Covid-19 pandemic.

When: 24 consecutive hours, beginning November 10, 2020 (Nov. 11 in Asia and Oceania) Topics: Trafficking, smuggling, counterfeiting, corruption, illicit markets, emerging crimes, and policy issues.

Audience and participants: academics, researchers, practitioners, students.

Co-sponsors: CIROC, IASOC, ECPR-SGOC, GI-TOC.

Conference background: i. A 24-hour conference to accommodate a time-bound, non-traveling global audience.

ii. Avoiding webinar "lectures," leaving more space for questions and discussion.

iii. Opportunities for audience interaction maximized. All sessions are 75 minutes in length.

Five Session Formats:

a. Regular panel session (RPS): a moderator and three panelists, limited to 10-minute presentations. Introductions by the moderator, followed by 30 minutes of presentations (3 x 10), then questions from those submitted online via chat. Submit individual submission proposals to Dina Siegel Dina.S@uu.nl or full panel submissions to Jay Albanese jsalbane@vcu.edu

b. Research Note "Catwalk" session (RNC): a moderator and four presenters. Speakers have 5 minutes to summarize their work/idea with any results, and why it is important. Then the online audience asks questions. Lots of interaction, brainstorming encouraged. Individual or full session proposals to: Dina Siegel Dina.S@uu.nl

c. Commentary on OC policy session (CPS): a moderator and up to four presenters, including practitioners or policymakers. Speakers get 5 minutes to state their perspective on a single current or proposed policy or strategy related to organized crime at the local, national, or international levels. Comments from the online audience for the presenters. Individual or full session proposals to: Felia Allum F.S.Allum@bath.ac.uk

d. Virtual library interview (VLI): a moderator will interview a recent (2019-2020) book author with a short summary of the book, followed by a one-on-one interview with the online audience submitting questions. Submissions to: Jay Albanese jsalbane@vcu.edu