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American Probation and Parole Association 44th Annual Training Institute

The adult and juvenile justice systems are experiencing significant and powerful change driven by justice reform and innovative practices focused on promoting public safety in a more fair, just, and effective manner. America’s ever-changing landscape poses challenges and opportunities to incorporate diversity, equity, and inclusion in justice system program development, culturally competent and trauma-informed service delivery, and organizational change.

This summer’s training institute, which focuses on the theme of “Passion, Courage, and Endurance: Transforming Community Corrections,” provides an interactive learning experience for professionals involved in the community corrections, juvenile justice, and treatment professions. The training institute comprises workshops, intensive sessions, guest speakers, and a resource expo on topics such as policy reform, organizational development, and strengthening community partnerships, providing knowledge and tools to help shape the future of community corrections by meeting the needs of today’s professionals.

Date: August 17–21
Location: San Francisco, California

Learn more and register.

 

This website is funded in part through a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice

Risk and protective factors. National Sexual Violence Resource Center. 2019

This infographic highlights the connections between risk and protective factors and social determinants of health at the various levels of the social ecology and can be used to link sexual violence prevention with anti-oppression and related public health issues in order to create more effective change. (Source: NSVRC).

Register for Webinar: Responding to the 2019 Solicitation for the Justice and Mental Health Collaboration Program

Hosted by The Council of State Governments Justice Center with funding support from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance

 

Date: Thursday, May 16, 2019
Time: 1–2 p.m. ET

 

REGISTER FOR WEBINAR

 

In this webinar, representatives from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance and The Council of State Governments Justice Center will review the FY2019 Justice and Mental Health Collaboration Program application process. This grant program provides awards of $100,000 to $750,000 for a 24- to 36-month project period to states, local governments, and federally recognized Indian tribal governments. There are three grant categories:

  • Category 1 Collaborative County Approaches to Reducing the Prevalence of Individuals with Serious Mental Illnesses in Jails
  • Category 2 Strategic Planning for Law Enforcement and Mental Health Collaboration
  • Category 3 Implementation and Expansion

Panelists:

  • Maria Fryer 
    Policy Advisor for Substance Abuse and Mental Health
    U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance
  • NiKisha Love 
    Policy Advisor for Justice and Mental Health Collaboration Program
    U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance
  • Sarah Wurzburg
    Deputy Program Director, Behavioral Health Division
    The Council of State Governments Justice Center

Register for Webinars] Responding to FY2019 Second Chance Act Solicitations

Innovations in Supervision Initiative: Building Capacity to Create Safer Communities Program

 

Hosted by the National Reentry Resource Center, with funding support from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance

 

Date: Tuesday, May 14
Time: 1:30–2:30 p.m. ET

 

LEARN MORE AND REGISTER

 

During this webinar, representatives from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and the National Reentry Resource Center will describe the FY2019 Second Chance Act Innovations in Supervision Initiative (ISI) grant program and application process. A FY2015 ISI grantee will also join to share their experience from the application process and offer suggestions on how to successfully prepare to apply for this grant.

 

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CEP Awards 2019

The second edition of the CEP Awards will be presented during the General Assembly in October 2019! With the awards, CEP would like to celebrate outstanding contributions to probation. From the 5th of February 2019, you can start with submitting your nominations in the following categories:

  • Rehabilitation in the community
  • Social inclusion
  • Public protection
  • Research
  • Development of national probation services

 

Please click on the link to nominate your project for a CEP award. Registration is open until the 31st of May 2019.

CEP: Presentations Domestic Violence Expert Meeting now available!

Domestic Violence Experts gathered in Vilnius, Lithuania, on the 7th and 8th of March 2019 for the CEP and EuroPris Expert Meeting on Domestic Violence in Prison and Probation. During this first meeting of the expert group on domestic violence the group has been given national presentations that provided a good picture on what’s going on in this field.

Domestic violence stands for at least 1/5 of all crimes in many countries and there is a common belief that domestic violence still is underreported. Many cases of domestic violence include very serious crimes like murder and the minor ones seem to be forgotten or neglected. It is important to remember that victims of domestic violence can be both men, women and also children. There is also a cultural dimension on how acceptable domestic violence is and what is considered domestic violence. Economic factors and opportunities that are offered to victims of domestic violence have a strong influence on the possibility to leave a violent relationship.

Many NGO´s in this field focus on the victims and distrust the prison and probation sector. They tend to forget that working with offender is a way to protect future victims. The Prison and Probation service in some countries works with victims of crimes but in many countries there are other services for victims. There is lack of programmes for treatment of domestic violence in prison in many countries. The Istanbul convention gives some direction for the work with perpetrators but is in general strongly victim oriented.

Close cooperation with different services is very important in domestic violence cases. Common tools provide for a common language which is important when many stakeholders are involved. SARA is a good example of that.

There is lot of good working already running in prison and probation organisations. But still there is a lot to be learned and developed. The first meeting of this expert group was a good start for further learning and development in this important field.

Upcoming event: Criminal Justice Summer Course

Upcoming event: Criminal Justice Summer Course

Only one month left to register!

The Criminal Justice Platform Europe (CJPE) organises the 3rd International Criminal Justice Summer Course in Barcelona (2-5 July 2019). The Summer Course will be a combination of workshops, plenary sessions and field visits bringing together participants with a background in prison, probation and restorative justice from a variety of European countries. 

The theme chosen for this edition of the Summer Course is “Criminal Justice in a Polarised Society“. The aim is to offer an unique opportunity for criminal justice colleagues from different jurisdictions to reflect on what impact polarisation is having upon crime. Extremist views in the media attract huge attention; reactions across society can create anxiety, anger, harm; politics and religion seem more divisive than ever; and professionals in the criminal justice system have to find a way to engage with diverse offenders and prevent paths that may lead to further violence. By sharing ideas and considering the very latest research and programmes, participants of this Summer Course will be stimulated to engage with the debate on polarisation and to make a positive contribution back home.

Please visit the CEP website for more information about the Criminal Justice Summer Course or to register for the event

Emissions and microplastics: How food waste hurts the environment

Emissions and microplastics: How food waste hurts the environment

Throwing away food that could still be eaten isn't just a waste of money, it also costs precious resources, hurts the climate, threatens biodiversity and can contaminate our soil with microplastics. "I once found 200 to 300 Euros worth of Sushi, still in its original packaging," Lea recalls. It's not her real name. She wants to remain anonymous because what she does could lead to prosecution in Germany. The college student goes dumpster [...]

2019-05-18
dw.com

[Register for Webinar] Innovative Programming for Veterans in the Criminal Justice System

 

 

Hosted by The Council of State Governments Justice Center with funding support from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance

 

Date: Thursday, June 6
Time: 2–3:30 p.m. ET

 

REGISTER FOR WEBINAR

 

Veterans who are incarcerated have unique needs for services, which often include behavioral health treatment. In response, some correctional facilities have developed programming tailored for veterans in their facilities and have curated partnerships with justice programs in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affair’s Veterans Health Administration to better serve them. This webinar will focus on the programming developed specifically for veterans in two jurisdictions—the Middlesex County Sheriff’s Office in Massachusetts and the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department in California—and explain how these jurisdictions developed partnerships with their Veterans Affairs resources and other entities in their criminal justice systems. There will be time for questions and answers at the end of the webinar.

Presenters:

  • Jessica Blue-Howells, National Coordinator, Health Care for Reentry Veterans, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Christine Brown-Taylor, San Diego County Sheriff’s Department Reentry Services Manager, California
  • Sean Clark, National Director, Veterans Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Maria Fryer, Justice System and Corrections Policy Advisor for Substance Abuse and Mental Health, Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice
  • Sheriff Peter Koutoujian, Middlesex County Sheriff’s Department, Massachusetts
  • Katherine Nicholas Malvey, Veterans Justice Outreach Specialist, Bedford, Massachusetts
  • Angela Simoneau, Veterans Justice Outreach Specialist, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System
  • Mark Stovell, Senior Policy Analyst, The Council of State Governments Justice Center

 

 

 

This announcement was supported by Grants No. 2016-MU-BX-K002 and 2016-MU-BX-K003 awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance. The Bureau of Justice Assistance is a component of the Department of Justice's Office of Justice Programs, which also includes the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the Office for Victims of Crime, and the SMART Office. Points of view or opinions in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

Register for Webinar] Responding to the 2019 Solicitation for the Second Chance Act Improving Reentry for Adults with Co-occurring Substance Abuse and

Hosted by the National Reentry Resource Center, with funding support from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance

 

Date: Tuesday, May 28
Time: 2–3 p.m. ET

 

REGISTER FOR WEBINAR

 

In this webinar, representatives from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance and the National Reentry Resource Center will review the FY19 Improving Reentry for Adults with Co-occurring Substance Abuse and Mental Illness application process.
 
This grant program will provide awards of up to $1 million for a 48-month project period to state and local government agencies and federally recognized Indian tribes (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior). Applicants must apply within one of the following three categories, depending upon their jurisdictional status:

  • Category 1, Competition ID BJA-2019-15323: Units or components of state government agencies serving the adult reentry population.
  • Category 2, Competition ID BJA-2019-15324: Units or components of county or city local government agencies serving the adult reentry population.
  • Category 3, Competition ID BJA-2019-15325: Federally-recognized Indian tribes and Alaska Native tribes and/or tribal organizations serving the adult reentry population.

Panelists:

  • Andre Bethea 
    Policy Advisor for Corrections
    U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance
  • Sarah Wurzburg
    Deputy Program Director, Behavioral Health
    The Council of State Governments Justice Center

 

 

 

This project was supported by Grant No. 2016-MU-BX-K011 awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance. The Bureau of Justice Assistance is a component of the Department of Justice's Office of Justice Programs, which also includes the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the Office for Victims of Crime, and the SMART Office. Points of view or opinions in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

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A refugee’s personality is one of the factors which decides how successful integration is

Refugees who are more willing to take risks, who tend to reciprocate friendliness, and who are more strongly convinced than others are that they are in control of their lives integrate into society faster. This is the result of a study undertaken on the basis of the “IAB-BAMF-SOEP Survey of Refugees in Germany” which researchers from the Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) at the German Institute of Economic Research (DIW) devised in conjunction with researchers from the University of the Saarland and the University of Münster. The study was published recently in the “Collabra: Psychology” journal.


The “IAB-BAMF-SOEP Survey of Refugees in Germany” is the largest representative longitudinal survey of refugees who came to Germany between 2013 and 2016. In order to determine which factors contribute to successful integration, the researchers evaluated the data of more than 4,000 participants in the study who had already been living in Germany for an average of 18 months at the time the survey was carried out.

“Our study demonstrates for the first time that, in addition to socio-demographic factors, it is also individual personality traits which play a decisive role in any successful integration of refugees,” says psychologist Elisabeth Hahn from Saarland University, the lead author of the study.

According to the study, refugees who are more willing than others to take risks, for example, find work faster and have more social contacts with local residents. Those who are more strongly convinced that they are in control of their lives and who reciprocate the friendliness shown by other people find it easier to make inroads into society than others do. They have more friends and are more self-confident, more contented and healthier.

The – frequently traumatic – experiences undergone while fleeing, and the unfamiliar circumstances in the new country, place a heavy burden on refugees. “But if people are convinced that they can influence their fate,” explains SOEP researcher David Richter, “they have a far greater scope for action than if they think they are at the mercy of their circumstances.” “Also, a general tendency to take the occasional risk, and to reciprocate people’s friendliness, seem to be helpful in the difficult process of integration,” adds Münster University’s Mitja Back, an author of the study.

The study also confirms a series of findings arrived at in earlier studies on the integration of immigrants – findings which also hold true for refugees who have recently arrived in Germany: “People who have been living in Germany for a longer period of time find it easier to integrate than others,” says Jürgen Schupp, Deputy Director of the SOEP. A better knowledge of German and a good level of education acquired in their home country also help decisively in making integration succeed. Gender also evidently plays a role: Female refugees are less frequently employed and they have fewer social contacts. “Religious affiliation of the participants – whether Islam or Christian – was not related to the extent to which refugees are integrated,” adds Mitja Back. “This contrasts with the prejudices commonly found in host societies“.

Refugees who wish to live in Germany permanently currently find support in various areas of life – for example, in acquiring language skills or in looking for work. Based on the findings, the authors of the study also call for refugees’ individual personality traits to be taken into account in integration programmes. “Help for refugees should also include supporting and encouraging the personal resources and social skills which these people bring with them – for example, the ability to make new contacts with other people,” says Elisabeth Hahn.

Originalpublikation:
Hahn, E., Richter, D., Schupp, J., & Back, M. D. (2019). Predictors of Refugee Adjustment: The Importance of Cognitive Skills and Personality. Collabra: Psychology, 5(1), 23. DOI: http://doi.org/10.1525/collabra.212

Climate change is a critical factor in Lake Chad crisis conflict trap: New report

Informationsdienst Wissenschaft - idw - Pressemitteilung
adelphi research, Christopher Stolzenberg, 15.05.2019 00:01

UNDP-supported report finds solutions to Lake Chad crisis must address climate change; and that climate impact must be considered a factor in many conflicts around the world


Climate change is playing a critical role in the persistent crisis blighting the communities and countries that depend on Lake Chad in West Africa, combining with violent conflict, endemic corruption, environmental mismanagement and poverty, according to a new United Nations Development Programme-supported report.

Shoring Up Stability: Addressing Climate and Fragility Risks in the Lake Chad Region reveals that a crisis so often blamed on violence, poor governance and a shrinking lake is in fact profoundly impacted by climate change, and that any solution to stabilise the region must take into account the impacts of climate change.

“In many countries, we are seeing crises grow and worsen because of factors which seem obvious, be it armed conflict, corruption or poor governance. But in many cases, climate change is also playing a subtle but fundamental role,” said Ulrika Modéer, Assistant Administrator and Director of the Bureau of External Relations and Advocacy at UNDP.

“This new report shows that the crisis in Lake Chad is one of these crises. It makes a clarion call to consider climate change as a key driving factor in the crisis, and to seek solutions that address the climate change and the challenges it is presenting to the region,” said Modéer, who launched the report today at the Stockholm Forum for Peace and Development.

Janani Vivekananda, lead author of the report and Senior Advisor with independent think tank adelphi said: “In this report, we identified four climate-fragility risks in the region.”

“These are risks that climate change can exacerbate and include the undermining of livelihoods, conflict over natural resources, recruitment into armed opposition groups and the over-militarised response by local governments. All of these risks underline the fact that we need to focus our responses on addressing the root causes of a conflict to achieve lasting and sustainable solutions rather than thinking in traditional military terms,” said Vivekananda.

The report found that Lake Chad, which borders Nigeria, Niger, Chad and Cameroon, is not shrinking, contrary to popular belief. But, the report says, that does not mean this vital resource for tens of millions of people is not being affected by climate change. As well as intensifying the other factors contributing to the crisis, climate change is contributing to the changing size of the northern pool of the lake and the increasing variability in the timing and amount of rainfall. The resulting uncertainty means that communities that depend on the lake no longer know what to plant and when, or when to switch from one livelihood to another.

“Communities are vulnerable to the pincer movement of climate change and continuing conflict. Years of conflict, poverty and human rights violations have fragmented social bonds, making it harder for people to cope with and adapt to climate impacts,” said Modéer.

“At the same time, climate change is aggravating the political and economic conditions that caused the violence in the first place, which undermines efforts to break this vicious cycle,” she added.

Ultimately, the report said, conventional approaches to stabilising volatile contexts have limitations when tackling conflict over resources if they do not take climate change into account. The report concludes that its findings resonate well beyond the Lake Chad region and demonstrate that climate-resilient and conflict-sensitive interventions offer a better chance of delivering peace.

The new report is the first of its kind study on the Lake Chad region and a pioneer of climate-fragility risk assessments globally. It is the product of an intensive two-year period of research across Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria. It combines long-term hydrological data from the Lake Chad basin as well as brand new analysis of 20 years of satellite observations. It also builds on almost 250 interviews with community members, including past and present members of armed groups, as well as experts and officials.

Shoring up Stability was supported by UNDP, with additional research supported by the Foreign Ministries of the Netherlands and Germany: https://www.shoring-up-stability.org/